Holy Crap It’s Hot Out There!

Hot nuf to fry an egg!

It’s a hot one in the city! Hot enough, as they say, to fry an egg! Well..I’m no myth buster, so I’m not sure if you can in fact fry an egg on a hot sidewalk or road, but it’s hot all the same.

Personally I’m loving it, I love the heat, I’m a summer baby, but I also escape from time to time inside to a nice cool air-conditioned house as well. ~smiles~ today though, they say it’s gonna be an even hotter of the hot days. These must be the dog-days-of-summer! Ever wonder where that phrase came from?

Dog Days” (Latindiēs caniculārēs) are the hottest, most sultry days of summer. In the northern hemisphere, they usually fall between early July and early September. In the southern hemispherethey are usually between January and early March. The actual dates vary greatly from region to region, depending on latitude and climate. Dog Days can also define a time period or event that is very hot or stagnant, or marked by dull lack of progress. The name comes from the ancient belief that Sirius, also called the Dog Star, in close proximity to the sun was responsible for the hot weather.

The Romans referred to the dog days as diēs caniculārēs and associated the hot weather with the star Sirius. They considered Sirius to be the “Dog Star” because it is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Major (Large Dog). Sirius is also the brightest star in the night sky. The term “Dog Days” was used earlier by the Greeks (see, e.g., Aristotle’s Physics, 199a2).

Dog Star: Sirius

The Dog Days originally were the days when Sirius rose just before or at the same time as sunrise (heliacal rising), which is no longer true, owing to precession of the equinoxes. The Romans sacrificed a brown dog at the beginning of the Dog Days to appease the rage of Sirius, believing that the star was the cause of the hot, sultry weather.

Dog Days were popularly believed to be an evil time “when the seas boiled, wine turned sour, Quinto raged in anger, dogs grew mad, and all creatures became languid, causing to man burning fevers, hysterics, and phrensies” according to Brady’s Clavis Calendarium, 1813.

The modern French term for both this summer period (and for heat waves in general) “canicule”, derives from this same term. It means “little dog”, again referring to Sirius.

In Ancient Rome, the Dog Days extended from July 24 through August 24 (or, alternatively July 23-August 23). In many European cultures (GermanFrenchItalian) this period is still said to be the time of the Dog Days.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac lists the traditional timing of the Dog Days as the 40 days beginning July 3 and ending August 11, coinciding with the ancient heliacal (at sunrise) rising of the Dog Star, Sirius. These are the days of the year when rainfall is at its lowest levels.

source: Wikipedia

So here we are right dead center in the middle of the ‘dog days’ and man is Sirius a-barking…~giggles~ I couldn’t resist!

Love & Hugs

~T~

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